Lead times are 6-8 weeks | June '22

The Ghost chair, a postmodern neoclassical chair

The Ghost chair, a postmodern neoclassical chair

The Louis Ghost chair was designed by Philippe Starck, iconic French designer, architect, and interior designer.

Towards the end of the 1960s, Starck founded his first company, in which he produced inflatable objects. In 1969 he became artistic director of Pierre Cardin; in 1974, he emigrated to the USA, and after two years, returned to his native Paris, where he designed his first nightclub, La Main Bleu.

In 1979 he established the company Starck Product. During the 1980s, he remodeled the private quarters of French President François Mitterrand at the Palais de l'Elysée, among many projects. In the late 1980s, he built the ship La Fiamma for the company Asahi and was responsible for the interior decoration of the Paramount Hotel. In addition, he was the designer of the Argentinean businessman Alan Faena both in Buenos Aires, in his constructions in Puerto Madero, and in the Faena District in Miami. In 2010 he renovated La Alhóndiga in Bilbao.

The Ghost chair was designed in 2002 for Kartell, an Italian plastic products company founded by Giulio Castelli in 1949. It is made from polycarbonate that is poured into a single mold. The "ghost" quality is due to its transparency. It is a contemporary stylization of the neoclassical Louis XVI. It can be found in slightly tinted colors, the original transparent polycarbonate, and in the opposite neutrals: black and white.

"The Louis Ghost chair is self-projected. It is a "Louis something," a kind of specter, of reflection, the shadow of a styling chair that I have called Louis Ghost, the ghost Louis," said P. Starck about his creation.

The Louis XVI chair in Versailles manufacture was originally made of wood and fabric on the back and seat, renowned for its elegance and simplicity. The Ghost chair, postmodern, reinterprets the style: its backrest is oval, the arms gently outward and downward to reach the bottom of the seat; the legs are straight at the front and slightly curved at the back. It gives us back an ethereal and crystalline image. The chair supports excess weight and can be stacked without fear of damaging the surface. It is also weather-resistant and can be used in both indoor and outdoor designs.

The Lou Lou Ghost Chair is a smaller version of the Louis chair and is designed for children. The Victoria Ghost version is similar to the Louis style but without armrests. Both are great as dining chairs and side chairs; when added to two Louis Ghost chairs, they make a complete dining set. Meanwhile, the Charles Ghost is a stool with a round seat but no backrest.

"Phantom" has been transformed, dressed, painted, and photographed by artists and designers from all over the world, undergoing various reinterpretations and mutations but keeping its essence unchanged. In 2004, 43 creatives (Christian Lacroix, John Galliano, Elizabeth Garouste, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, among others) dressed her for a charity auction for La Source. In 2009 for the Salone del Mobile, it was dyed pink to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Barbie doll; in 2011, it was among the protagonists of the project "Kartell Loves Milano," intervened by the Israeli artist Uri Shapira, becoming the center of the covers of magazines all over the world.

Design

A Louis XVI chair was originally made of wood and fabric on the back and seat. It is known for its simple elegance. The Starck ghost chair repeats the same style; the back is oval, the arms gently outward and downward to reach the bottom of the seat, and the legs are straight at the front and slightly flared at the back. It offers an ethereal and crystalline image.

Manufacture of a Louis Ghost chair

A polycarbonate is injected into a mold in the shape of a Louis XVI chair. There are no seams or joints; a body is a continuous form. The original design had no color, hence the name "ghost chair." The Louis Ghost chair is currently produced in six transparent colors and two solid colors: black and white.

Durability

The composition of the ghost chair is extra strong polycarbonate which makes it durable and scratch-resistant. There are no connection points within the form and no joinery, giving it strength. The chair supports excess weight and can be stacked without fear of damaging the surface. The Louis Ghost chair is also weather resistant and can be used as outdoor furniture and interior design.

Maintenance

A Louis Ghost chair can be cleaned with a damp cloth and slightly soapy water. While polycarbonate is scratch-resistant, avoid abrasives and chemicals during cleaning. Wipe with a dry cloth to prevent water spots. The chair can be used outdoors but should be cleaned if exposed to rain.

Variants

The Lou Lou Ghost chair is a smaller version of the Louis chair and is designed for children. The Victoria Ghost Chairs are similar to the Louis style but without armrests. These are great dining chairs and side chairs; when added to two Louis Ghost chairs, they make a complete dining set. The Charles "ghost" is a stool with a round seat but no back. They are all made in the same way as the Louis Ghost chair and have the same qualities.

Curiosities

Louis Ghost has been transformed, dressed, painted, and photographed by artists, stylists, designers from all over the world, undergoing various contaminations and mutations, but keeping its soul unchanged. In 2004, 43 creatives (including Christian Lacroix, John Galliano, Elizabeth Garouste, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac...) dressed it for a charity auction for La Source; for the 2009 Salone del Mobile it was dyed pink to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the world's most famous plastic doll, Barbie; in 2011 it was among the protagonists of the "Kartell Loves Milano" project; once again, the chair is "crystallized" by the Israeli artist Uri Shapira. And, naturally, it becomes a protagonist on the covers of magazines all over the world.

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